Title Format Sponsor
Speech Acts in Films
Web

Description

Speech Acts in Films is a site where students of Mandarin Chinese learn to examine, understand, and practice social language through the medium of film. The primary audience of the materials are low-advanced and advanced learners who completed approximately two years of language instruction. The materials have been developed for blended-learning environments, but can also be used for self-study, or as supplemental materials in traditional instructional settings.

Resource Link
13 Jahre Deutsche Vereinigung: A Sample Project for Advanced Learners of German
Print

Description

Project outline with section on "advancing students' language abilities" for intermediate/advanced learners of Geman.

Resource Link
Korean Grammar in Discourse and Interaction
Print

Description

Six units on discourse and interaction features. Design of materials is based on a large corpus of naturally occurring language. Supplemental materials or for self-study. <br><br> Unit 1: Completive Aspect Markers <br> Unit 2: Honorific Speech Levels <br> Unit 3: Newly Perceived Information<br> Unit 4: Route Directions <br> Unit 5: Noun Modifiers <br> Unit 6: Relative Clause Constructions<br>

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Upcoming Events
Oct
2018
14 - 19
Arizona
Symposium
L2DL - Participation, Equity and Inclusion: L2 Digital Literacies (L2DL) Symposium

Participation, a long-standing assessment category on language syllabi, has found a new conceptual life over the last few decades as digital literacies practices have become a part of everyday life and learning. This symposium aims to contribute to discussions of the role of digital literacies in second language learning and teaching and biliteracy development, by considering the ways in which technologically-mediated communication can enable new forms of participation and access, but also the ways in which participation in digital spaces is rarely full and equitable, but is more often than not fraught with questions of legitimacy and symbolic power. This is the third event in a biennial series that examines various roles of digital literacies in language learning; presentations and resources from the 2014 and 2016 symposia can be found on the website and CERCLL's YouTube channel.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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