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Performance and portfolio assessment (1985–1995): An extended annotated bibliography of sources useful for language teachers
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This bibliography offers a collection of extended article summaries drawn from the performance and portfolio assessment literature of the past decade. Articles include journal entries as well as book chapters, and they were chosen based on the representation of various segments of the relevant literature. Annotated entries represent the general education literature and the L2 literature, and they cover theoretical bases for performance and portfolio assessment as well as implementation of and research on alternative forms of assessment. Also included are representative articles from the relevant assessment validity literature. Finally, other related references (not annotated in the current bibliography) are listed. The bibliography should be of use to language testers, language educators, and language researchers interested in the development of performance and portfolio assessment over the past ten years.

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Reanalysis of discernment from a social constructivist perspective: Academic consultation sessions in Japanese universities
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From the social constructivist perspective, this paper examines speech style shifts in academic consultation sessions between professors and students in Japanese universities and demonstrates that politeness is an interactional achievement. The paper attempts to show how what has previously been described as a display of discernment can be reanalyzed as an active co-construction in the sequential organization of talk.

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UG access in L2 acquisition: Reassessing the question Colloquium papers from the Second Language Research Forum 1998 October 15–18, 1998 at the University of Hawai‘i
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Original Invitation to the Colloquium: At a special colloquium at SLRF/Los Angeles in 1989, participants examined the so-called access question: Is Universal Grammar accessible to the (adult) L2 learner? Given that nearly ten years have passed since that colloquium, and given that we have, in that time, learned a good deal more about the nature of the human language faculty, it seems like a good time to reexamine the assumptions that went into the original UG-access research of the 1980s. In particular, then, questions that participants at the present colloquium might consider include (at least) the following: Is the original access question a reasonable one to ask at the present time? Does the current state of linguistic theory, our current understanding of the human language potential, warrant the original question? If not, how should the question be reformulated? How would such a reformulation affect our understanding of previous research, as well as any future attempts at falsification of a reformulated question? After the colloquium, several members of the audience asked whether we had taped or videotaped the session. In fact, the idea had never dawned on any of us. In the days after the conference, we then discussed the feasibility of making the papers available as unpublished manuscripts on the web. Of course, because the manuscripts do not include the Q&A discussions that followed each and every presentation, making the papers web-accessible will not substitute entirely. Nevertheless, we hope that the papers will at least stimulate further discussion of the issues. Indeed, if you have questions of your own, you are certainly welcome to e-mail any of us.

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2018
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L2DL - Participation, Equity and Inclusion: L2 Digital Literacies (L2DL) Symposium

Participation, a long-standing assessment category on language syllabi, has found a new conceptual life over the last few decades as digital literacies practices have become a part of everyday life and learning. This symposium aims to contribute to discussions of the role of digital literacies in second language learning and teaching and biliteracy development, by considering the ways in which technologically-mediated communication can enable new forms of participation and access, but also the ways in which participation in digital spaces is rarely full and equitable, but is more often than not fraught with questions of legitimacy and symbolic power. This is the third event in a biennial series that examines various roles of digital literacies in language learning; presentations and resources from the 2014 and 2016 symposia can be found on the website and CERCLL's YouTube channel.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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