Title Format Sponsor
Bilingual Language Profile
Web

Description

The Bilingual Language Profile (BLP) is an instrument for assessing language dominance through self-reports that is concise, quick, and easy to use. The BLP is intended to produce a continuous dominance score and a general bilingual profile taking into account a variety of linguistic variables. The BLP is an open and free assessment tool for researchers, educators, and anyone with an interest in assessing language dominance.

Resource Link
Actividades de práctica con aprendices del español
Web

Description

This site, aimed at Spanish language learners, educators, and researchers, provides an online corpus of videos of second language and heritage language learners of Spanish during oral interviews covering a variety of topics. It provides supplemental activities to help viewers investigate learners’ language and proficiency levels.

Resource Link
Voices for Openness in Language Learning
Web

Description

Voices for Openness is a professional development project from the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL). We are a world-wide community of collaborators — forward-thinking students, educators, content developers, and technologists carrying the banner of Open Education in language learning. From first-time Yoruba language student to the editor of a world languages website, we are people who are excited about Open Educational Resources (OER). These web-based learning materials, which can be accessed freely by the public, are the building blocks of the Open Education movement. Read our stories and consider adding your own voice! In keeping with the spirit of openness, the material on this site is available for the public to distribute, edit, and build upon freely, along with a credit attribution to the original source.

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Upcoming Events
Jun
2019
10 - 11
Texas
Workshop
Spanish Heritage Language Workshop

This is a workshop for Spanish teachers of heritage speaking high school and university level students. We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

Event Link
Jun
2019
10 - 14
New Mexico
Institute
Eleventh Heritage Language Research Institute

For over a decade, research in the field of heritage languages (HLs) has focused on understanding the linguistic properties of HLs in all contexts from childhood to adulthood. This understanding has informed best practices in HL education, helping heritage speakers develop higher proficiency through language programs that address their linguistic and identity needs. The HL research that underpins these findings has focused on more widely-studied languages such as Spanish, Russian, or Chinese. However, HLs are everywhere, not only in these communities nor in typical immigrant environments. More needs to be done to understand the effects of language development and education in understudied bilingual populations with respect to heritage development. This Institute will bring together scholars who have long worked on more familiar HLs as well as researchers working on Native American languages (which often have heritage language varieties), sign languages (in the context of bimodal bilingualism), creole languages (as a paradigmatic case of language contact), and several lesser-studied HLs. Methods needed to address the linguistic and sociocultural dynamics experienced by these bilingual populations can be refined in comparison with established teaching methods. Joint discussions at the Institute will further our understanding of language change under intense contact and will allow us to propose new policies and educational strategies needed to maintain and promote heritage languages among their speakers. The Institute will feature presentations by researchers, discussion sessions, and two round table sessions: (1) on HL support in schools with the aim of helping heritage speakers succeed personally, linguistically, and academically, and (2) on lesser-studied HLs in larger HL contexts. In addition, there will be an all-day workshop will cover: (1) the principles and practices of heritage language teaching and project-based learning and (2) strategies for meeting the needs of heritage and second language learners in mixed classes.

Event Link
Aug
2019
1 - 2
Texas
Workshop
Games2Teach Collaboratory

An interactive workshop where teachers play technology-mediated games, learn how game design principles promote language acquisition, and learn to implement games in their classrooms. Based on the Games2Teach project from CASLS (University of Oregon) and CERCLL (University of Arizona). We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers