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Short-cut proficiency assessments (C-tests)
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Description

Since 2014, the AELRC has developed and piloted eight short-cut proficiency assessments, also referred to as C-tests. These instruments are useful for estimating global proficiency quickly and accurately with diverse populations (such as university, community college, high school, and heritage learners). The AELRC is working to finalize the validation of the Mandarin C-test, develop and validate a C-test in Turkish, and improve the existing C-test in Russian. The AELRC will also develop a web-based system for sharing the instruments with the field. For more information on the development of C-tests across multiple languages, see John Norris (Ed.), Developing C-tests for estimating proficiency in foreign language resource. 2018.

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Annotated bibliography: Overview of evaluation and assessment in heritage language learning
Web

Description

This annotated bibliography presents a synopsis of studies, from as early as 1989 to the present, which address different issues related to heritage language assessment and program evaluation. It is composed of 8 parts: (a) Reviews; (b) Surveys; (c) Assessment (placement and other tests); (d) Assessment for the purpose of differentiating HLLs and non-HLLs; (e) ACTFL Proficiency guidelines for assessing HLLs; (f) Evaluation of HL programs; (g) Sociocultural aspects (identity, attitudes, and motivation); and (h) Key background and theoretical papers on HLLs

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Alphabet tutorials for heritage languages of Arabic, Hindi, Persian, Urdu
Web

Description

The NHLRC in conjunction with the STARTALK program created online orthography tutorials to give high school heritage learners a head start before taking our UCLA summer courses. They are specially designed for heritage learners of Arabic, Hindi, Persian, and Urdu, taking their knowledge of basic vocabulary and oral skills into account to make a bridge to literacy. Each tutorial is sequential: teachers introduce a certain number of letters in each lesson, providing multiple ways to practice identifying and writing each letter. The following lessons build on the previous ones, until students are practicing reading, listening to, and writing all the letters in the alphabet. Because of this structure, we recommend that you begin at the beginning and go through the lessons in order without skipping. We hope you enjoy these tutorials and let us know whether they helped you learn.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2019
13 - 14
District of Columbia
Workshop
East Coast Organization of Language Testers (ECOLT) 2019

The East Coast Organization of Language Testers (ECOLT) represents an East Coast group of professionals, scholars, and students who are involved in language testing projects and research. One of the organization's goals is to support connections between academia, K-12 education, government, and for-profit and not-for-profit testing organizations. In addition to providing a forum for continued learning and networking, ECOLT strongly supports the work of graduate students. The eighteenth annual conference will be held in Fall 2019, and will be hosted by the AELRC at Georgetown University.

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Sep
2019
27
Arizona
Symposium
LiLaC- Literatures, Languages and Cultures in the 21st Century

CERCLL will be leading a new initiative on campus in this series of events and professional learning communities for the University of Arizona’s faculty, administrators and graduate students in language, literature and culture departments to explore today’s best practices and models for foreign language, literature and culture departments. We are hosting the launch event on Friday, September 27, 2019 (2:00-5:00 pm) on campus. It will feature world-renowned speakers who have a record of innovative program development. In a roundtable discussion, the invited speakers will each share transdisciplinary initiatives they have lead on their home campuses. This will be followed by breakout sessions in which participants can focus on themes of specific significance to them. Through these conversations, we will identify future directions to explore as a campus. The event will conclude with a reception. Featured speakers: Charlotte Melin (Professor of German University of Minnesota-Twin Cities) Gillian Lord (Professor and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, University of Florida) Domna Stanton (Distinguished Professor of French, CUNY; former President of the MLA) The event is for University of Arizona faculty and graduate students, with a focus in world language study. All participants must register in advance to attend. Organized with the College of Humanities.

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Oct
2019
4
Georgia
Symposium
World Languages Day

Interested in joining us and other Atlanta business, government, and education industry leaders? Register on our website today as a sponsor, exhibitor, or school! World Languages Day is a free information fair connecting over 1,000 high school and college students to businesses and professions that value global skills. World Languages Day is organized as a resource fair in which the students will be able to go from table to table to talk with representatives from different companies, non-profits, and government organizations about the career opportunities in their fields that come with language study and cultural competency. Highlighting these skillsets, World Languages Day’s attending organizations include representatives across international commerce, social services, and governmental agencies. Through real-world experiences, open dialogue about industry needs, and a push for globally-minded talent across potential employees, World Languages Day students are empowered to create a “map” from language success to a future professional career.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers