Title Format Sponsor
Tajiki Textbook
Print

Description

A Tajiki textbook, presented in two volumes with a Reference Grammar for Beginners. An introduction includes information on the origins of Tajiki and historical and contemporary influences on the language. Volume One's chapters: the Tajiki Alphabet, Classroom, Greetings, Acquaintance, the Weather, Family, and At the Bazaar. Volume Two's chapters: Sport, Around the Dastarkhon, Clothing, At the Hospital, At the University, City and Village Life, and Welcome to Tajikistan. All Tajiki texts written in Cyrillic script. Chapters include sections on topic, grammar, and function, and each ends with a Tajiki-English glossary. Chapter exercises incorporate pairwork, reading and writing tasks, and listening and video exercises. Each chapter has illustrations, mostly photographs, and cultural notes. An accompanying Multimedia CD-ROM includes the audio and video material for textbook exercises, games including matching, hangman, and unscrambling, and reading texts with comprehension exercises. A separate Video CD-ROM offers supplementary audio and video exercises based on textbook material, as well as thirty-one short theme-based videos. The Reference Grammar for Beginners Guide features grammatical topics, including pronunciation, numbers, tense, mood, and voice, conjugation, singular and plural forms, relative clauses, auxiliary verbs, and reported speech. The textbook is available directly from Georgetown University Press: http://press.georgetown.edu/search/search.php?q=tajiki&x=0&y=0

Resource Link
Uzbek Textbook
Print

Description

A textbook for introductory students of Uzbek. Has fifteen chapters covering themes including greetings, classroom objects, requesting/asking/apologizing/giving commands, food, health, and others. Chapters include sections called Let's Get Started, Language Point, Language in Use, Uzbek Realia, and Vocabulary, illustrations, both photographs and drawings, and a glossary. Textbook includes a CD with audio and video exercises, which includes television clips and unscripted dialogues among native speakers. Textbook includes Appendices A through D. Appendix A has transcripts of the audio and video dialogues; Appendix B is a grammatical summary; Appendix C is an Uzbek-English glossary; and Appendix D has two parts: the first part is an English-Uzbek glossary, and the second is a set of maps of the world with country names provided in Uzbek. Latin script is used throughout the textbook. Accompanied by a workbook/complementary reader in a single volume. Workbook has exercises to the textbook, all in Latin script, and reader introduces Uzbek Cyrillic script, both print and script forms, and has supporting exercises for learning script. Texts in the reader are all in Cyrillic and include authentic texts (maps, tickets, ads) and additional reading texts. Available from CeLCAR at: http://www.indiana.edu/~celcar/orderform/index.html

Resource Link
Pashto News
Web

Description

Pashto news is part of CeLCAR's Central Asian News Project which produces listening and reading exercises for students of Central Asian languages at the intermediate and advanced levels. The goal is to help students build their listening skills, broaden their vocabulary and grammar, and deepen their understanding of the cultures and politics of the various countries of the region. For selected languages, CeLCAR produces original texts—both reading and listening--based on a variety of contemporary sources. The texts are supplemented with a glossary, background information, and a number of exercises, including multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, drag-and-drop, and open-ended questions. For other languages, CeLCAR adapts an already-existing text taken from a Central Asian news agency or world broadcaster. In these cases, the texts are read by a native speaker who also creates the accompanying exercises and glossary. These texts are generally aimed at more advanced learners. In all cases, CeLCAR will provide information on the original source of the texts.

Resource Link
3 of 673
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Upcoming Events
Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

Event Link
Apr
2019
13
Georgia
Workshop
Weapons of Mass Instruction: Making the Most of Planning, Routines, and Structure

Participants will be charged to reflect on the structure, routines, and high-leverage habits that make their class a memorable experience for students rather than just memorized content. In the context of large, diverse classes, the presenter will share the ACTFL Six Core Practice hacks that make can-do and proficiency-based language teaching enjoyable and effective. Participants will receive all files used and then, in turn, create their own versions to fit their own beginning 2019-20 units to start the school year refreshed and excited.

Event Link
May
2019
17
Georgia
Symposium
Global Languages Leadership Meeting

Interested in joining us and other Atlanta business, government, and education industry leaders? Contact cultr@gsu.edu As an intimate luncheon, this event is tailored to foster conversation and learning about topics related to cultural competency, language learning, and essential skills for an emerging global workforce. Past organization attendees includes the Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Atlanta Public Schools, Cox Automotive, French Consulate in Atlanta, Marriot International, Office of Congressman John Lewis, Peace Corps, Telemundo Atlanta, and many more. Whether you’re looking to build your network, gain industry insight, or listen to inspirational experiences of renowned peers, there’s something unique waiting for you at GLLM19. CULTR is delighted to feature on this year’s program, Tim Mahoney, Chief Marketing Officer of Global Chevrolet & Global GM Marketing Operations Leader, as the 2019 plenary speaker.

Event Link
0 - 3 of 11
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers