Title Format Sponsor
Telecollaboration in foreign language learning: Proceedings of the Hawai'i Symposium
Print

Description

The Symposium on Local & Global Electronic Networking in Foreign Language Learning & Research, part of the National Foreign Language Resource Center's 1995 Summer Institute on Technology & the Human Factor in Foreign Language Education, included presentations of papers and hands-on workshops conducted by Symposium participants to facilitate the sharing of resources, ideas, and information about all aspects of electronic networking for foreign language teaching and research, including electronic discussion and conferencing, international cultural exchanges, real-time communication and simulations, research and resource retrieval via the Internet, and research using networks. This collection presents a sampling of those presentations.

Resource Link
Chinese language video lessons for classroom use (text + videos)
Audio-Visual

Description

These fifteen lessons in Mandarin Chinese, comprising a book with instructions for the teacher and student worksheets for photocopying plus two accompanying video cassettes, are designed as supplemental material for students from Novice to Advanced level and may be integrated into existing curricula. The lessons model a performance-based five-stage scheme for lesson development, derived from natural reading/listening behaviors, which can be applied by teachers to other selections from Chinese Language Video Clips for Classroom Use, also available from NFLRC Publications.

Resource Link
Mari belajar sopan santun Bahasa Indonesia manual (text + 2 videos + website)
Audio-Visual

Description

Filmed on location in East Java, Indonesia, the Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia set consists of two videotapes, a manual, and extended notes on the individual video scenarios. The videos present interactions among Indonesian native speakers and foreign language learners as they engage in tasks and activities of everyday life. The purpose of the videos is to model for foreign language learners how to speak politely in Indonesian by drawing their attention to the ways language is used and the ways it varies according to the social context in which the interaction occurs. The manual accompanying the videos includes the pedagogical background of this project, sample lessons, learning focus, suggested activities, and bibliographies on Indonesian pragmatics and on the teaching of pragmatics in foreign language classrooms. A document containing extended notes on the videotaped scenarios is available at no charge online.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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