Title Format Sponsor
The role of consciousness in second language learning
Audio-Visual

Description

Richard Schmidt presents on the role of consciousness in second language learning at the 1988 Second Language Research Forum (SLRF) held in at the University of Hawai‘i.

Resource Link
Using surveys for understanding and improving foreign language programs
Print

Description

The goal of this guide is to help language educators develop surveys that produce useful information for evaluation in language programs. To that end, survey methods are situated within a method of evaluation that emphasizes use and usefulness (Norris & Watanabe, 2011; Patton, 2008). This approach is explicitly geared to ensure that evaluations impact programs in the ways stakeholders desire. By undertaking survey methods in this way, people who do evaluation in their programs will be more likely to use survey findings for understanding and improvement.

Resource Link
L2 learning as social practice: Conversation-analytic perspectives
Print

Description

This volume collects empirical studies applying Conversation Analysis to situations where second, third and other additional languages are used. A number of different aspects are considered, including how linguistic systems develop over time through social interaction, how participants 'do' language learning and teaching in classroom and everyday settings, how they select languages and manage identities in multilingual contexts and how the linguistic-interactional divide can be bridged with studies combining Conversation Analysis and Functional Linguistics. This variety of issues and approaches clearly shows the fruitfulness of a socio-interactional perspective on second language learning.

Resource Link
3 of 684
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Your search did not return any results. Please change your search criteria.
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers