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Documenting and Revitalizing Austronesian Languages
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The case studies in this volume lead to a discussion of changes in the field of linguistics and the alliances which are being built between linguists and community language activists. The 11 chapters in the book touch upon the key themes of international capacity building initiatives, documentation and revitalization activities, and computational methods and tools for language documentation. <a href="http://www.nflrc.hawaii.edu/ldc" target="blank"><i>Language Documentation & Conservation</a> Special Publication No. 1</i>

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Explicit and incidental instruction and learner awareness
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Explicit instruction can facilitate learner awareness of the surface features of a language, but does not guarantee it. Similarly, learners in an incidental learning condition are not necessarily unaware. This study investigated the development of awareness, among Japanese ESL learners, of rules of thumb for the use of zero and definite articles with place names under an explicit instruction condition, in which learners were given the rules plus examples, and an incidental instruction condition, in which learners responded to sentences containing examples. All instruction was computerized. Instruction was given in English and was followed by a twenty-question debriefing interview conducted in the learners' L1 in order to assess their awareness. The findings show that awareness could develop under either condition, but that the explicit condition was much more facilitative. The study also found a very strong relationship between awareness and improved learner performance.

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Explicit instruction and JFL learners
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This paper reports on a semester-long study of the explicit instruction of Japanese discourse markers to English-speaking, intermediate learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language. It was found that the learners improved their use of DMs, particularly to manage fundamental aspects of their extended tellings: openings, presentation of content and closings.

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Upcoming Events
Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

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Apr
2019
13
Georgia
Workshop
Weapons of Mass Instruction: Making the Most of Planning, Routines, and Structure

Participants will be charged to reflect on the structure, routines, and high-leverage habits that make their class a memorable experience for students rather than just memorized content. In the context of large, diverse classes, the presenter will share the ACTFL Six Core Practice hacks that make can-do and proficiency-based language teaching enjoyable and effective. Participants will receive all files used and then, in turn, create their own versions to fit their own beginning 2019-20 units to start the school year refreshed and excited.

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May
2019
17
Georgia
Symposium
Global Languages Leadership Meeting

Interested in joining us and other Atlanta business, government, and education industry leaders? Contact cultr@gsu.edu As an intimate luncheon, this event is tailored to foster conversation and learning about topics related to cultural competency, language learning, and essential skills for an emerging global workforce. Past organization attendees includes the Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Atlanta Public Schools, Cox Automotive, French Consulate in Atlanta, Marriot International, Office of Congressman John Lewis, Peace Corps, Telemundo Atlanta, and many more. Whether you’re looking to build your network, gain industry insight, or listen to inspirational experiences of renowned peers, there’s something unique waiting for you at GLLM19. CULTR is delighted to feature on this year’s program, Tim Mahoney, Chief Marketing Officer of Global Chevrolet & Global GM Marketing Operations Leader, as the 2019 plenary speaker.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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