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Perform Suzhou: a Course in Intermediate to Advanced Spoken Mandarin
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Perform Suzhou: a Course in Intermediate to Advanced Spoken Mandarin is a self-manageable intensive course designed to help Chinese language learners raise their level of sophistication in interacting with the local people while staying and studying in Suzhou. Communication strategies developed through this course will be generally applicable to other cities in China.

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Coyote Traces – Aku Wuwu’s Poetic Sojourn in America
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Aku Wuwu is a poet of the Yi ethnic minority in China, also a literary critic and a professor at Southwest University for Nationalities. "Coyote Traces – Aku Wuwu’s Poetic Sojourn in America" consists of 80 poems written in Chinese about Aku’s observations and insights during his travels among people of various races in America from Aku’s unique perspective as a cross-culture individual himself. This book also includes two valuable interviews of the author by one of the translators – Professor WEN Peihong. The other translator is Professor Mark Bender from DEALL at OSU. Here, we present the recitations of the poems in this book, as sound is always an important part of poetry. Reciters: Chinese – SUN Hong, professor and head of the Department of Performance (Drama, TV, and Film) in the School of Arts at Southwest University for Nationalities. English – Mark Bender, professor of Chinese literature and folklore at The Ohio State University.

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Tiger Traces: Selected Nuosu and Chinese Poetry by Aku Wuwu
Audio-Visual

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This book (with CD) introduce the poetic works of Aku Wuwu, a poet from an ethnic minority group in southwest China called Yi. Aku is a member of a subgroup of the Yi known as the Nuosu, who had an “independent kingdom” in the mountains of southern Sichuan province for hundreds of years. Although most contemporary Yi poets write in Chinese, Aku has taken the lead in composing poetry in the Nuosu dialect. Because of these efforts he has been called the “creator of modern poetry in Yi.” Aku is presently a professor of Yi Studies at Southwest Nationalities University, Chengdu, Sichuan province. The English versions of the Chinese language poems were made by Mark Bender (Professor of DEALL, OSU), while the versions of the Nuosu poems were made in a joint effort by Bender, Aku, and Jjiepa Ayi, a graduate of the Yi Studies Center at the Southwest Nationalities University. For the included recitation of the poems, Aku reads from both his Chinese language and Nuosu dialect poems, including his most famous work, “Calling Back the Soul of Zhyge Alu.” Kate Polak, a performance poet and graduate of the creative writing program at Ohio State University, joins Mark Bender in reading English versions of Aku’s poems. This is the first time Nuosu language poems have been released to a global audience.

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Upcoming Events
Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Call for Papers
CALL FOR PAPERS: 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

ICLDC 2021: GENERAL SESSION PROPOSALS (PAPERS & POSTERS – DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30, 2020) While we especially welcome abstracts that address the conference theme, we also welcome abstracts on other subjects in language documentation and conservation, which may include but are not limited to: - Archiving and mobilizing language materials - Ethical issues - Indigenous language education - Indigenous sign languages - Language and its relation to health and well being - Language planning - Language reclamation and revitalization - Language work in the era of covid-19 - Lexicography, grammar, orthography and corpus design - Multidisciplinary language documentation - Successful models of documentation - Technology in documentation and reclamation - Topics in areal language documentation - Training and capacity building in language work - Other PRESENTATION FORMATS Papers: To allow for as many presentations as possible, we have decided that all 20-minute paper presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to a platform (to be announced) a few weeks before the beginning of the conference. Conference participants will then have an opportunity to watch presentations before the beginning of the conference. During the conference itself, each paper presentation will be given scheduled time for questions and discussion synchronously over Zoom (details of the discussion period will be announced in October 2020). We are also exploring different ways of encouraging interaction asynchronously (e.g., by posting comments and questions) or synchronously throughout the conference. Posters: To allow for as many poster presentations as possible, posters will be uploaded as a PDF a few weeks prior to the beginning of the conference. Poster presenters will have the option of uploading an accompanying 10 minute audio/video recording walking participants through the poster. Poster presenters will also have the opportunity to interact with participants at a scheduled time during the conference. All paper and poster presentations will be archived in ScholarSpace, the University of Hawaii Repository, for continued viewing after the end of the ICLDC. For more details or to submit a proposal, visit http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/call-for-proposals/papers-posters/

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Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Conference
7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC) University of Hawaii at Manoa March 4-7, 2021 COVID-19 STATEMENT Due to COVID-19, ICLDC 2021 will be held virtually. The ICLDC 7 organizers are excited about this year’s theme, and the possibilities for broad international discussion that an online conference can offer. We are currently investigating what technologies we will use and how the conference will take shape and how we can accommodate time zone differences for presenters, as well as family and work obligations. We look forward to your participation. Please “join” us! CONFERENCE THEME: RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS There are many critical challenges that endangered language documentation and conservation faces, some of which seem insurmountable, and despite linguists’ best efforts, many of the proposed solutions fall short. These challenges have been apparent to many communities, language activists and academic linguists since (or even before) the earliest public warnings of the “endangered language crisis” in the early 1990’s, and recognition of the great number of large-scale challenges has only become more apparent since. One reason that many of the current solutions have not reached the level of success to which they have aspired is that the need to identify and/or foster relationships is often minimized or even ignored completely. Identifying and fostering relationships by taking the time to build understanding between stakeholders, learning about needs and skills that can be offered, and developing shared goals and outcomes are central to sustainable solutions for language documentation and conservation. These relationships go beyond those between communities and linguists and extend to multi-party relationships among linguists, communities, other academic fields, governmental and non-governmental organizations, educational and funding agencies, and many other individuals invested in the future of the language. There are also important intra-group relationships within these stakeholding groups (e.g., between members of an Indigenous community, or language workers documenting signed languages and those documenting spoken languages) as well as inter-group relationships between different Indigenous communities. At ICLDC 2021 we propose to initiate a dialogue on how recognizing relationships can help overcome the many critical challenges in language documentation and language reclamation. We believe that this focus will lead to improved connections among academic linguists, various communities, researchers from other disciplines, educational practitioners, and many other stakeholders. We specifically aim to draw attention to the transformative power of recognizing relationships to overcome critical challenges. For more information, visit our conference website: http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/

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