Title Format Sponsor
Dynamic Assessment Resources
Web

Description

A list of print and online resources on Dynamic Assessment.

Resource Link
Computerized Dynamic Assessment of Language Proficiency (CODA)
Web

Description

CODA is an online formative assessment tool designed to provide more fine-grained profiles of listening and reading comprehension abilities than possible with traditional tests by offering graduated assistance to student test-takers. This allows teachers not only to observe how many test questions learners answered correctly and incorrectly on the first try but also to document how much support was required by the student test-taker to complete the assessment. Test results are provided as unweighted and weighted scores for the class as well as for individual students. The tests are based on existing and recognized multiple-choice assessments of listening and reading comprehension.

Resource Link
Assessing Language Development
Web

Description

Updated 10/2016 This site is intended for language educators, especially those new to the profession. It will familiarize you with a range of approaches towards language assessment, including those that are often termed "alternative forms of assessment". The forms of assessment described here are not particular to any given language but can be used with learners of any language, including Chinese, Russian, Japanese, Arabic, and Korean as well as more commonly taught languages like Spanish, French, and German and English as a Second Language.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2022
12 - 14
Hawaii
Call for Papers
2022 Pragmatics & Language Learning Conference

The National Foreign Language Resource Center at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Center for Applied Second Language Studies at the University of Oregon are pleased to announce the 2022 Pragmatics and Language Learning Conference (PLL 2022) which will take place online on September 12-14, 2022. The conference main theme will be Teaching and Learning Interactional Pragmatics in a Digital World, but we welcome a broad range of topics in pragmatics, discourse, interaction, and sociolinguistics in their relation to second and foreign language learning, education, and use, approached from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. We hope this conference brings together scholars and educators from all around the world who are interested in discussing both established and innovative approaches to teaching and learning pragmatics to strengthen our understanding of principles and practices in PLL and push the field to new and exciting directions in research and practice. Plenary talks will be live and we have tried to schedule them so that a large part of our audience can access at least half of them. The rest of the presentations will be simulive (pre-recorded 20 minute presentation with live interaction by the presenters) or poster sessions (5-7 minute-pre-recorded presentation within Zoom breakout rooms for interaction). CALL FOR PROPOSALS The conference main theme will be Teaching and Learning Interactional Pragmatics in a Digital World, but we welcome a broad range of topics in pragmatics, discourse, interaction, and sociolinguistics in their relation to second and foreign language learning, education, and use, approached from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. ONLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: DEADLINE: March 1, 2022 via EasyChair Visit our website [ https://bit.ly/PLL2022 ] for more information and instruction on how to prepare your abstract proposal.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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